> The Things You Can Read: Teaching The Outsiders by S.E. Hinton

The Things You Can Read welcomes you and thanks you for your readership. We, here at The Things You Can Read, ask your help, if you visit our site regularly, please follow us either via email or Google Friend Connect.  Launched on June 7, 2012, our site has already attracted a great deal of attention.  One of the goals of the site is to feature reviews of Children's Picture Books, Young Adult novels and Adult Literary Fiction/Nonfiction.  A second goal for the blog is to be a resource for teachers of English and writing--with examples of student created writing, writing tips, resource links, and the opportunity to pick the brain of a seasoned English teacher.  To spice things up...every now and then, we'll also include random quotes and thoughts on education and life in general, but our ultimate goal is to reach out into the blogosphere and be a "Book Whisperer" and "Writing Whisperer" to children and adults of all ages.   Thank you for your readership.  Here is to a lifetime filled with reading and writing.

Teaching The Outsiders by S.E. Hinton

Teacher: CWhite
Class Level: Average/Advanced
Duration:
9 Weeks Extension/Enrichment

SOL Objectives:

7.1 The student will give and seek information in conversations, in group discussions, 
and in oral presentations.
a)  Use oral vocabulary and style appropriate for listeners.
b)  Communicate ideas and information orally in an organized and succinct manner.
c)  Ask probing questions to seek elaboration and clarification of ideas.
d)  Make supportive statements to communicate agreement with or acceptance of others. 
ideas.
e)  Use grammatically correct language and vocabulary appropriate to audience, topic, and
purpose.

7.5 The student will read and demonstrate comprehension of a variety of fiction, 
narrative nonfiction,and poetry.
a)  Describe setting, character development, plot structure, theme, and conflict.
b)  Compare and contrast forms, including short stories, novels, plays, folk literature, poetry,
essays, and biographies.
c)  Describe the impact of word choice, imagery, and poetic devices.
d)  Explain how form, including rhyme, rhythm, repetition, line structure, and punctuation,
conveys the mood and meaning of a poem.
e)  Draw conclusions based on explicit and implied information.
f)  Make inferences based on explicit and implied information.
g)  Summarize text.

7.8 The student will develop narrative, expository, and persuasive writing.
a)  Apply knowledge of prewriting strategies.
b)  Elaborate the central idea in an organized manner.
c)  Choose vocabulary and information that will create voice and tone.
d)  Use clauses and phrases to vary sentences.
e)  Revise writing for clarity and effect.
f)  Use a word processor to plan, draft, revise, edit, and publish selected writings.

7.9 The student will edit writing for correct grammar, capitalization, punctuation, 
spelling, sentence structure, and paragraphing.
a)  Use a variety of graphic organizers, including sentence diagrams, to analyze and improve
sentence formation and paragraph structure.
b)  Demonstrate understanding of sentence formation by identifying the eight parts of speech and
their functions in sentences.
c)  Choose pronouns to agree with antecedents.
d)  Use subject-verb agreement with intervening phrases and clauses.
e)  Edit for verb tense consistency.

Topics:

S.E. Hinton has written a novel that deals with the changes youth experience during adolescence.

Youth can relate to the themes and identity of characters in The Outsiders because of the 
similar characterization, make up of self and group uniqueness, and self-exploration. The 
gripping plot and identifiable characters, along with an excellent movie version with well-known actors, allows youths to relate the story to their own lives.

The unit is based on themes revolving around identity, the individual
vs. the group, heroism, innocence, experience, family, media influence, and crisis. I believe 
these thought-provoking issues will entertain youth’s interest in the novel and promote identity awareness.

The issues raised and dealt with in The Outsiders are ones that 7th graders in Middle School 
can directly relate.

The main theme surrounding identity is key for seventh graders because they are leaving 
childhood and becoming adolescents.  Their identities will be changing throughout secondary 
school and approaching the issues raised in the novel can help the youths to become more understandable of their changes and learn about their identity.

The unit will not only allow students to gain an appreciation for literature, it will allow for 
 self-exploration and growth. The final project allows the students to reflect on the novel as 
a whole and reflect on their identity and characteristics as they adjust to secondary school.

Unit Make-up:

The unit will consist of activities revolving around themes presented in the novel. Students will 
create a portfolio for the entire unit, which will be made up of their assignments, journal entries,
in-class worksheets, final project, and self-evaluation of the portfolio. The portfolio will reflect 
students’ progress made in the unit and in their self-evaluation.

The journal entries will be written from prompts provided. “Tuff Time”
is journal-writing time where students will be expected to write for 5-10 minutes. The attempt 
is to expose students to several writing activities throughout the unit. The entries will vary from questions in regards to one character, a theme, an issue, or an event. The journals are mostly 
creative and personal; answering prompts that deal with the novel, movie and the self.

The final project will allow for students to discover their own identity and relate themselves to 
a character in the novel. The students will have the freedom to express their own identity 
through pieces in the portfolio; journals, artwork, and anything else they wish to submit.  
Participation will include listening, speaking, interest in assignments and novel, completion of assignments and projects, and writing journal entries.


Learning Objectives:  Student will be able to –

- demonstrate an understanding of the main ideas, events, or
themes of a novel, story, poetry, and other print

- explain the motivation of the characters in works of
communication, providing evidence from the text of each work

- identify and explain connections between new ideas and
information and their previous beliefs, values, and experiences

- revise and edit their work to improve content, organization, and
effect to best suit their audience and purpose

- demonstrate pride and satisfaction in using language to create and
express their thoughts, ideas, and feelings

- create a variety of academic, technical, and personal
communications, including poems, stories, personal essays, oral
and written reports, group presentations, and informal
dramatizations

- identify personal strengths and goals related to using language and
use this information to set new goals

- use various strategies to resolve conflicts, solve problems, and
build consensus

- evaluate the effectiveness of literary techniques including figurative
language


Introduction: Takes several days of Class

Preparing to Read The Outsiders by S. E. Hinton

Themes found in The Outsiders


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=doKfBmjIOMA&safety_mode=true&persist_safety_mode=1

Book Trailer-Video

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wJnfleLeOZg&feature=related

Explore the 60s through videos and PowerPoint presentations

Activities:

Prereading Activtities

Day 1 Introduction
Preparing to Read The Outsiders by S. E. Hinton 

Anticipation Guide

Opening Credits for the movie

Day 2 Introduction
Preparing to Read The Outsiders by S. E. Hinton 

Author Bio
Read a short Bio about the author S.E. Hinton and then use the
Bio-Cube Creator to design S.E. Hinton's Bio-Cube

ReadWriteThink Bio-Cube Creator

Introductory Activity

Complete the Following:

http://poster.4teachers.org/worksheet/view.php?id=158926&page=1

__________________________________________________________

Letter from S. E. Hinton

Complete the Following:

http://poster.4teachers.org/worksheet/view.php?id=158943&page=1


The Outsiders
Chapter 1 and 2

Before Reading:
View Tribute to Paul Newman:  Pick one of the following-

After viewing Paul Newman Clip engage in a discussion about the actor and his
fame in 1967-68

Begin Novel

Read/Listen to Chapter 1 and 2

Questions related to Chapter 1 and 2

Characters

Learn about the Rodeo


Rodeo Video: YouTube


Learn about Drive-In Theaters

The Outsiders
Chapter 3 and 4

Listen/Read Chapters 3 and 4

Compare the Music of these three Musicans/Groups
Rank them on a scale of 1-10
10=Best
1=Least

Hank Williams, Sr. Click Here
Elvis Presley Click Here
The Beatles Click Here


Rate them 1-10 individually:
10 being what the one you enjoyed the most…

Then in Groups of three discuss your choices…
Remind the class that these were the musicians that were mentioned by Ponyboy in The Outsiders

Vocabulary-Group work

Questions-Group work

Taking the Beatles Further: 

This I Believe...
The Beatles Live On...
Click Here


Questions to use for this clip: Click Here

The Outsiders
Chapter 5

Read Chapter 5

Questions Chapter 5

Robert Frost Activities

Students will pick any eight lines of a Robert Frost poem to recite by memory to the class

Students will view the following clips:

Students will analyze the poem “Nothing Gold Can Stay”




Robert Frost



Students will analyze the poem “The Road Not Taken”


Computer Lab Time to pick a Robert Frost poem

Search all the poems of Robert Frost:
http://www.poemhunter.com/robert-frost/poems/

Find one poem you like  
 
Write down at least the first 8 lines of the poem in your journal 
 
You will present your 8 lines to the class from memory on ________________.

The Outsiders
Chapter 6

Under development

The Outsiders
Chapter 7

From chapter 7, find quotations that show how the following characters feel.

Ponyboy

·         The Police (page 74) ________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________

·         Johnny (page 76) ___________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________

·         His haircut (page 77) ________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________

·         Two-Bit (page 78) ___________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________

·         His brothers (page 80) _______________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________

Sodapop
·         The reporters (page 74) ______________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________

·         Reality (page 76) ___________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________

·         School (page 80) ___________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________

Darry
·         Ponyboy (page 76) __________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________

·         Steve (page 80) ____________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________

The Outsiders
Chapter 8

Under development

The Outsiders
Chapter 9

Under development
The Outsiders
Chapter 10

Under development


The Outsiders
Chapter 11

Under development


The Outsiders
Chapter 12

Under development 

After finishing the book: Options 

  1. Read the article from NPR: Rich Kids, Greasers, and the Life Changing Power of The Outsiders-Student created essay based on this article
  2. Watch the movie The Outsiders
  3. Write a book review and post it on Goodreads 
  4. Write a Movie Review
  5. Outsiders Board Game-Group Activity
  6. Character Tees
  7. Plot the novel outside using sidewalk chalk-HINT:  I have students plot it in the classroom before going outside.  They work in groups of three or four.  Each group member has to write one of the five sections of plot: Exposition, Rising Action, Climax, Falling Action, and Resolution/Conclusion.  The person who writes the climax also writes the resolution/conclusion. (See pictures below)



"Character Tees"? Here is how it works.  Cut out tee-shirts out of poster board or bulletin board paper, and then have students come up with words and images that represent a character from a class novel.   Here is the catch, no character names may appear on the "Character Tee".  Afterwards, display them and have a guessing contest to see who can correctly identify which tee's belong to which character. Check out Scholastic's website for reproducables to use with this activity.  


Evidence of Learning (Assessments):

Tests
Quizzes
Projects
Class Discussions
Classwork

Wrap-up/Reflection:
The Class will watch the movie version of the novel.

The Class will present final projects.

Weblog Entries
# Enrichment 5th Period
4th Period Class Identification: 222028 5th Period 2nd 9 Weeks 2011-2012 JEJ MOORE  
_________________________________________________________

Preparing to Read The Outsiders by S. E. Hinton

Themes found in The Outsiders

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=doKfBmjIOMA&safety_mode=true&persist_safety_mode=1

Book Trailer-Video

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wJnfleLeOZg&feature=related

The Outsiders 40 Years Later-Article

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wJnfleLeOZg&feature=related

An Outsider, Out of the Shadows-Article

http://www.nytimes.com/2005/09/07/movies/MoviesFeatures/07hint.html

Radio Interview with S. E. Hinton

http://www.mynorthwest.com/?nid=577&a=9604&p=&n=
_________________________________________________________

Anticpation Guide

Complete the Following:

http://poster.4teachers.org/worksheet/view.php?id=158936

_________________________________________________________

Introductory Activity

Complete the Following:

http://poster.4teachers.org/worksheet/view.php?id=158926&page=1

__________________________________________________________

Letter from S. E. Hinton

Complete the Following:

http://poster.4teachers.org/worksheet/view.php?id=158943&page=1

The Letter that Started a Movie-Video

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wtuc3i_3Kas
_________________________________________________________

Chapter One

Complete the Following:

Graphic Organizer:

http://poster.4teachers.org/worksheet/view.php?id=158928&page=1


Chapter One Questions and Direct and Indirect Characterization

http://poster.4teachers.org/worksheet/view.php?id=158944

Sample Assignment

http://poster.4teachers.org/view/poster.php?poster_id=428993

Actors Reading From The Outsiders-Video

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qYYTV6LHdl0&feature=related

_________________________________________________________

Chapter Two

Complete the Following:

http://poster.4teachers.org/worksheet/view.php?id=158930&page=1

SLANG

Complete the Following:

http://poster.4teachers.org/worksheet/view.php?id=158932&page=1
_________________________________________________________
Characters

_____________________________________________

Extension 5th Period

Robert Frost

Search his poems:
http://www.poemhunter.com/robert-frost/poems/

Find one poem you like

Write down at least the first 8 lines of the poem in your journal

You will present your 8 lines to the class from memory on October 16, 2012 
\
______________________________________________________
The Outsiders Important Links

S. E. Hinton Survey for Presentations
After the presentations please click on the link below and evaluate the project:

http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/T8MF9N2 
Posted by: cwhite


The Outsiders

S. E. Hinton Letter

    

Read S. E. Hinton's letter...

Dear Reader,
It is very difficult for me to write about myself, and especially The Outsiders, which was written at a 

horrendous time in my life, was published by a series of mind-boggling synchronicities, and has gone 
further than any author dared dream. But I’ll give it a shot.

I wrote The Outsiders when I was sixteen years old. Actually I began it when I was fifteen, as a short 

story about a boy who as beaten up on his way home from the movies.

But I didn’t just write The Outsiders, I lived it. Looking back, I realize how important it was to me to 

have another life at that time. To be someone else. To deal with the problems I had to face, and write 
my way to some sort of understanding and coping. This is all in hindsight. At the time, I was mad about 
the social situation in my high school. I desperately wanted something to read that dealt realistically 
with teen-age life.

I knew I was going to be a writer. I love to write. I began in grade school, because I loved to read, and 

liked the idea of making stories happen the way I wanted them to. By the time I was in high school I had 
 been practicing for years. So I was both elated and not surprised when I received my publishing 
contract on the day I graduated from high school.

Fans. I receive letters from every state, from dozens of foreign countries. From twelve-year-olds and 

forty-year-olds. From convicts and policemen, teachers, social workers, and of course, kids. Kids who 
are living like those in The Outsiders. Kids who can’t imagine living lives like those in The Outsiders. 
Kids who read all the time. Ones who never before finished a book.

The letters saying “I loved the book” are good, the ones that say “I never liked to read before, and now 

I read all them” are better, but the ones that say “The Outsiders changed my life” and “I read it fifteen 
years ago and I realize how much it has influenced my life choices” frankly scare me. Who am I to 
change anyone’s life? I guess the best reply is “It’s the book, not the author” and “It’s the message, not 
the messenger.” A lot of the time I feel that The Outsiders was meant to be written, and I was chosen to 
 write it. It’s certainly done more good than anything I could accomplish on a personal level.

If this sounds like I am overwhelmed by the decades of incredible response to what began as a short 

story I started when I was fifteen years old, well, I guess that’s the truth.

Stay Gold.
S.E. Hinton

Taken from the Author’s Foreword in The Outsiders Speak Platinum Edition, published by Penguin 

Group (1995)

Introduction:

The Outsiders was written by a teenager about teenagers. The author, Susan Eloise Hinton, began 

writing the story when she was 15-years-old and it was finally published when she was 17-years-old, 
in 1967. She was advised to use a pen name, S.E. Hinton, because the publisher did not think that people
would believe that a girl wrote this novel! Hinton began writing the story in response to an act of teenage
violence that occurred in her hometown. The setting of the novel, Oklahoma in the 1960s, is the same 
 setting in which Hinton wrote the book. Considered a coming-of-age novel, The Outsiders examines 

many social and teenage issues that were prevalent in the 1960s and are still issues today.

Answer the following questions in complete sentences.

Use the link below to submit your answers.

Discussion Questions:

1. What do you think “The Outsiders” means?

2. What is an “outsider”?

3. What do you think a “coming-of-age” novel means?

4. What do you think were some of the issues teenagers faced in the 1960s?

5. Do you think these are issues that teenagers still face today?




Links:

 

 

 

The Outsiders

Character Identification


 

The Outsiders


From left to right………

Two Bit Matthews—comedienne—loves Mickey Mouse

Soda Pop Curtis—“dreamboat”—caught in the middle between
Ponyboy and Darry

Ponyboy Curtis—youngest Greaser—smart, sensitive, tells the story of The Outsiders

Dallas Winston—slick, “bad boy,” street smart

Johnny Cade—Greasers’ pet, abused, caring

Darry Curtis—oldest brother, smart, handsome, aging before his
time

Steve Matthews—Soda’s best friend, loves to fight

In your journal see if you can match the correct actor with the character he portrayed in the movie version.

Actor Character

C. Thomas Howell __________________
Matt Dillon _________________________
Ralph Macchio ______________________
Patrick Swayze ______________________
Rob Lowe __________________________
Emilio Estevez ______________________
Tom Cruise ________________________

Check the following site out to see if you were correct.





Links:

The Outsiders

Chapter One

 


 

Chapter 1

Discussion Questions:

1. Who is the narrator? Where is the setting of the novel?

2. Why do you think the Greasers and the Socs do not get along?

3. How does this rivalry affect Ponyboy?
Why do you think Ponyboy likes books and movies?

Copy the "Characterization" definitions in your Journals

There are two ways in which we, the readers, learn about the characters in a novel.

Direct Characterization – where the writer makes direct statements about a character’s personality and tells what the character is like. (“Tells”)

Indirect Characterization – where the writer reveals information about a character and his personality 

through that character’s thoughts, words, and actions AND where the writer reveals information about 
a character by how other characters respond to that character, including what they think and say about 
him. (“Shows”)
__________________________________________________________________________

The Outsiders
Chapter One Questions


Description: The Outsiders Cast

Image copyright: www.IMDB.com

Chapter 1

Discussion Questions:

1. Who is the narrator? Where is the setting of the novel?


2. Why do you think the Greasers and the Socs do not get along?


3. How does this rivalry affect Ponyboy?
Why do you think Ponyboy likes books and movies?


Name:
Period:
The Outsiders

Slang Terms

 


 

Slang Terms from THE OUTSIDERS

On a separate sheet of paper complete the following glossary of slang from the novel:

"Outsiders" Slang (1967/68)
Modern Slang (2011-If any)
Standard English Translation

Example:

dig (p.7)
sweet
like, enjoy

jump (p.8)

beer blasts (p.8)

hoods (p.8)

slugged (p.10)

tuff (p.15)

broad (p.16)

swipe (p.17)

savvy (p.18)

the fuzz (p.20)

boozed up (p.26)

rank (p.32)

Come up with at least three other examples of slang found in the novel. Identify the page where 

the word is found, a modern day slang equivalent-if any, and its translated meaning.

The Outsiders

Anticipation Guide

 


 

The Outsiders….ANTICIPATION GUIDE

True or False

1. As long as no one uses weapons, fighting is ok.

True or False

Explain:


2. The Outsiders.was written by a 15 year old student.

True or False

Explain:

3.A “gang” member or bad person could never do anything heroic..

True or False

Explain:

4. Sometimes it takes losing someone we care about, to truly see the world.

True or False

Explain:

5. All kids have the same basic problems.

True or False

Explain:

6. .People who smoke are “tuff.”.

True or False

Explain:

7. I know someone who died violently.

True or False

Explain:

8. Sometimes murder is justifiable..

True or False

Explain:

9. Being in a gang is cool.

True or False

Explain:

10. Justice should be equal between the rich and the poor.

True or False

Explain:

11. Sometimes violence is needed to resolve conflict.

True or False

Explain:

12. People should stick to their own kind when choosing friends.

True or False

Explain:

Thinking it over…..respond to the following…..

Have you ever felt like you were an “outsider?”

Explain:



Do you think people from different groups/backgrounds are treated differently in society? (school, shopping, police, etc.)

Explain:

Complete this sentence….
Usually the people I hang out with are………

The Outsiders

Similarities and Differences

 

 

Using information from Chapter One complete the graphic organizer on a separate piece of paper. Include illustrations that represent both groups (at least 5 illustrations for each group):

Examples for Greasers

Hair grease
Cigarettes
Switchblade

Examples for Socs

Madras Shirts
Corvair (Type of Car)

__________________________________________________________________________________________
The Outsiders

Chapter Two Flashback and Foreshadowing

 


 

Chapter 2

Copy the following definitions in your journal:

Foreshadowing….a technique an author uses to help the reader predict what might happen in the plot of 

a story.

Flashback….a literary technique used which relays information about something that happened earlier in 

a character’s life.

On a separate sheet of paper anwser the following question:

After reading Chapter 2, what (flashback) information did you learn about Johnny that might be 

important to the plot of the story? What can you infer about Johnny based on this information.
__________________________________________________________________________________________

Unit Assessment:
Participation 15%
Journal 15%
Portfolio 40%
Final Project 30%
(Comparing Identities: You vs. Who?)
____
Total 100%

Portfolio: The portfolio will be a collection of students’ work throughout the
unit. It will include journal entries (“Tuff Time”), writing assignments,
worksheets, and poetry. The portfolio will reflect the progress the student
has made over the course of the unit by demonstrating their understanding
of self-identity and the characters identity in the novel. The portfolio will also
display the student’s writing abilities in different genres. Refer to Portfolio
Rubrics for evaluation criteria. The portfolio is worth 40% of unit total mark.
The portfolio will be out of 100 marks, taking each of the rubric categories
(there are 4) and evaluating the student’s portfolio and then multiplying that
number by 5. Each section (there are 4) will be marked out of 25, making
the whole portfolio out of 100 marks.

Final Project: The Comparing Identities: You vs. Who? Project will help
students discover their own identity and relate themselves to a character
from the novel. They will have the freedom to express their own identity in
the genre of their choice. Students are encouraged to analyze a character
and themselves and compare and contrast their identities. (Check rubric for
evaluation criteria)

Journal: Over the course of the unit, students will write journal entries, “Tuff
Time”, based on prompts that relate to the novel. They will pick the best
three journal entries to be read in detail by the teacher and mark those with
stickers. The journal will either be personal reflective or reflective towards
the novels themes and characterization. Each journal entry will be:
- a creative experience
- 5-10 minutes of writing
- not evaluated on grammar, but on thoughtful completion
- written from a prompt provided by the teacher
Journal entries are 15% of total mark for unit. The top three journal entries,
chosen by the student, will be marked out of 5 each, for a total of 15 marks.

Participation: Student’s participation will be evaluated throughout the unit.
Participation evaluation will be based on students’ listening skills, speaking
skills, interest in unit and assignments, and completion of projects. Student’s
listening skills will be evaluated daily through activities, discussion, and
assignments. Speaking skills will be evaluated daily as well, through role-play
activities, class discussion, and group presentations. Interest in unit and
assignments will be an overall mark based on the entire effort and interest
the student had over the length of the unit and the work ethic placed in
assignments and activities. The completion of projects will include handing
assignments in on time, and completing the requirements for assignments.
Participation is worth 15% of the total unit mark.

Activities in Unit:
1) Create chart lists about identity, class, race, and cliques

2) Provide a shoe box (or other small box) and decorate it with pictures,
quotes, whatever of things that identify you – this will become student’s
portfolio box

3) Self-identity analysis – what makes me who I am?

4) “Tuff Time” prompts for journal entries – relating to identity, family,
cliques, characterization, media influences, analysis of movie, Greaser vs.
Soc

5) Group work, East vs. West – chart out the differences and similarities
between the Greasers and Socs

6) In groups, students chart out a character through physical characteristics,
personality traits, and relationships

7) Analyze Robert Frost’s poem “Nothing Can Stay Gold” – students interpret
poem

8) Role-Play scenarios involving key characters and key scenes – perform for
class and discuss reactions

9) Write a newspaper article from the perspective of a journalist who is
either a Greaser or Soc – students choose between 2 events: a) Johnny’s
stabbing of Bob, or b) Johnny and Ponyboy’s rescue of the children in the
church fire

10) In groups, students brainstorm places to go for help when in a crisis,
and students brainstorm ways to deal with a crisis on their own – eg. If
you were Johnny and Bob and the other Socs were trying to drown
Ponyboy, what would you do?

11) Discuss Johnny’s interpretation to Frost’s “Nothing Can Stay Gold” and
relate it back to the student’s own interpretation of the poem

12) Class, group, and partner discussions about themes and issues in
novel

13) Final Project: An analysis of self and a character in the Outsiders

LESSON 1: Outside Identity!

Theme: Identity – Individuality vs. The Group

Learning Outcomes:
- demonstrate an understanding of the main ideas, events, or
themes of a variety of novels, stories, poetry, and other print
- identify and explain connections between new ideas and
information and their previous beliefs, values, and experiences
- apply various strategies to generate and shape ideas

Objectives:
- understand theme of identity
- define identity, class, and race
- discuss the differences between individuality and group identity
- discuss the concepts of cliques and gangs

Plan:
(1) Hook: “Tuff Time” journal entry, students will write about
their personal identity and their group of friends identity
What is your personal identity? What is your group of
friend’s identity?
10 m.

(2) Discussion: Define identity, class, and race, provide
examples
10 m.

(3) Activity 1: Students, in groups of 3 or 4, will be given a
topic to brainstorm on chart paper dealing with identity
Topics: individuality, cliques, or gangs
Students will brainstorm and chart for 10 m.
and then present their brainstorm to the class
After each topic group(s) has presented, the
class will add more ideas to chart and hang
charts on walls (to be left up for whole unit)
25 m.

(4) Introduction to S.E. Hinton’s novel The Outsiders (hand
out copies of novel)
10-12 m.

(5) Activity 2: Discuss with partner what makes you unique
(eg. sport activity you participate in, musical instrument)
and then your partner is going to introduce you to the
class with your name and what makes you unique
10 m.

(6) Closure: Exit Slip – Define identity. What is the difference
between individuality and belonging to a clique or gang
identity? Give an example for each. Hand in when done.
10 m.

(7) Homework/Agenda: Read Chapter 1 for next class
6 m.

Assessment:

Activity 1: Students demonstrate their understanding of individuality,
cliques, and gangs by brainstorming

Activity 2: Can students provide an example of something that makes
them unique?
Closure/ Exit Slip: Can students define identity?
Can students explain the difference between individuality
and clique/group identity?
If students can provide an example and definition to the above criteria, we
can assume they understood the concept of identity. If students can find an
example of something that makes them unique, they are able to describe a
part of their identity and will be able to discuss in further their self-identity in
future lessons

LESSON 2: The 1960s Setting

Theme: Setting and Issues of the 1960s

Learning Outcomes:
- organize details and information about material they have read,
heard, or viewed using a variety of written or graphic forms
- identify and discuss various persuasive and advertising strategies

Objectives
- discuss the setting of the 1960s and the novel
- discuss the issues of the 1960s
- discuss the differences and similarities of 1960 vs. 2003
- readdress identity in terms of the media’s portrayal

Plan:
(1) Hook: “Tuff Time”, Having read the first chapter of The
Outsiders, what is your impression of the setting,
including time period and place? What clues helped you
come to these conclusions?
10 m.

(2) Discuss the ideas & perceptions of setting – focus on
clues that lead them to their decisions in “Tuff Time”
5 m.

(3) Present the 1960s era to the students – pictures, icons,
music, newspaper headlines, etc.
15 m.

(4) Discussion of 1960s - how does it relate to 2003?
Similar/Different?
10 m.

(5) Activity 1: Magazine Worksheet
Materials needed: teen magazines (both sexes)
Worksheet (attached)
Students follow worksheet and pull out ads that
demonstrate identity of people and gender
25 m.

(6) Chapter 1 – Introduction to story & Ponyboy
Who is Ponyboy? Who do we learn about in Chp. 1?
Discuss story elements: introduction, setting,
mood, and theme
What has the story taught us at this point?
What is the setting of The Outsiders telling us?
(identity, cliques, etc.)
10-12 m.

(7) Closure: What are 2 differences between the 1960s and
2003? 2 Similarities?
3 m.

(8) Homework/Agenda: Collect Magazine Worksheet this
class, bring a shoebox or other kind of small box to next
class
2 m.

Assessment:
“Tuff Time” Discussion: Students discuss setting and what clues in Chapter
1 brought them to their conclusion.
Activity 1: Look at students’ Magazine Worksheet and the ads
they chose, along with the answers, do they
represent a good/bad portrayal of identity?
Closure: Class answers questions as a whole

LESSON 3: Who Am I?

Theme: Self-identity and the portfolio

Learning Outcomes:
- describe and give examples to explain their personal criteria for
assessing and responding to what they view, read, or hear
- compose or create works of communication for specific audiences
and purposes, including to entertain, persuade, or inform

Objectives: (SWBAT)
- evaluate their self-identity & values
- openly discuss their identity
- relate themselves with a figure (famous actor, musician, athlete,
etc.) and analyze why they feel they can relate to that person
- observe the roles of gender and discuss gender identity

Plan:
(1) Hook: Name Identity – In pairs, students will write a
name poem for Ponyboy (see attached worksheet)
10 m.
(2) Discuss Ponyboy Name Identity poems – what does it say
about him? Student’s present their poem
10 m.
(3) Introduce Portfolio Project (see handout). Explain shoe
box concept and decoration of portfolio box (to be done
on their own time).
15-20 m.
(4) Who is S.E. Hinton? What role does gender play in the
identity? How does your gender influence you?
15 m.
(5) Activity 1: Choose a famous person (musician, actor,
athlete, writer, etc.) who you feel shares a similar identity
and has the same values as you. Jot down those values
and write a paragraph or two explaining why you feel the
two of you have a similar identity and values. [OR choose
a person who has the complete opposite identity and
values from you and explain]
10 m.
(6) Share with a partner your writing. Hand in writing at end
of class. Ask for volunteers to share writing.
7 m.
(7) Closure: What are 3 traits that help define Ponyboy’s
identity?
3 m.
(8) Homework/Agenda: Read Chapters 2 & 3 for next class
2 m.

Assessment:
Name Identity: Have students read the first chapter? If so, they
will be able to describe appropriate characteristics
of Ponyboy’s identity
Activity 1: Students will hand in their writing about a famous
person with similar identity and values. Their
explanation should include reference to themselves
and give a description of why they feel they have a
similar identity and similar values.
Closure: Students can answer question with 3 correct traits

LESSON 4: Who Am I? Cont’d

Theme: Characterization

Learning Outcomes:
- create a variety of academic, technical, and personal
communications, including poems, stories, personal essays, oral
and written reports, group presentations, and informal
dramatizations

Objectives: (SWBAT)
- identify the various characters in The Outsiders
- analyze the characters identities
- do a detailed tripod chart identifying the characteristics of a
particular character
- give a detailed description orally of a particular character

Plan:

(1) Hook: “Tuff Time” – Who are you? What makes you
unique? What factors influence who you are? (family,
friends) Why?
10 m.

(2) Activity 1: Groups of 3 or 4, assign each grp. a character:
Ponyboy, Soda, Darry, Steve, Two-Bit, Johnny, and
Cherry. Each poster will include:
Characters name
Physical characteristics
Personality traits
Relationship to other characters
Any other relevant information
25 m.

(3) Each group will present poster – put posters up on walls,
add information as you learn more about characters
throughout unit
10 m.

(4) As a class, discuss the differences and similarities of each
character
Are the identities the same?
Different?
Does gender play a role in
identity or position?
What makes the characters
different? Money? House?
Clothes?
15 m.

(5) Relate the characters to the students – w/ partner & class
Do any characters seem similar
to you?
Different? How?
Do you know someone who is
similar to one of the characters?
8 m.

(6) Closure: Give one characteristic or piece of information
about Darry. About Cherry. About Sodapop.
2 m.

(7) Homework/Agenda: Write a 1-page journal entry about a
particular even that has impacted your life and has
shaped who you are. Include a photo, drawing, or object
that represents this event and explain why you chose the
item.
2 m.

Assessment:

Activity 1: Will assess if they have read up to chp. 3 because
students will have to recall knowledge of characters. They
will be allowed to use their texts, will have to read into
the descriptions posed by Hinton
Discussion: Can students make connections and observe the
differences between characters? Are they able to present
ideas that demonstrate the differences and similarities
between the characters?
Can the students identify the “real” identities that the
characters in The Outsiders possess and understand the
realistic qualities of the text
Journal Entry: Express an event that has characterized their life. Are the
students able to reveal personal information in a written
form and reflect on the event and its “power” over their
lives? This will become a part of their portfolio
Closure: Students can identify one characteristic or provide one
piece of information about the 3 characters

LESSON 5: Clash of the Cliques

Theme: Greasers vs. Socs

Learning Outcomes:
- create a variety of academic, technical, and personal
communications, including poems, stories, personal essays, oral
and written reports, group presentations, and informal
dramatizations
- identify gaps in information obtained

Objectives: (SWBAT)
- look at the differences and similarities of Greasers and Socs
- place students in position of either a Greaser or Soc and encourage
them to question their identity in terms of the clique they belong or
do not belong to
- become aware of how stereotypes cause tension between different
social class groups, different racial groups, etc.

Plan:

(1) Hook: ID Card – students will be given a card with their
identity for the day (see attached sheet) for a role play
activity later in lesson
5 m.

(2) Discussion:
Pony’s neighbourhood, The East, what is it
like?
What is the West like?
What are the differences between East &
West?
Similarities?
How does where the characters live make
them different from each other?
How are they really different?
15 m.

(3) Activity 1: Role Play w/ ID Cards for Chp 2 & 3
See attached sheet for format
30 m.

(4) Discuss Role Plays after each scene
What makes this scene important?
What does it tell us about the differences
between the East & West?
How are the characters different?
What part of the role-play was most effective
in demonstrating the divide between East &
West and the characters?
(total of 5 m. each group)
20 m.

(5) Closure: What is the difference between a Greaser and a
Soc? Provide 2 characteristics for each.
4 m.

(6) Homework/Agenda: Read Chapters 4 and 5 for next class,
Portfolio boxes are to be left in the classroom, add any
“Tuff Time” journal entries to portfolios
3 m.

Assessment:

Discussion: Are the students able to identify the differences and
similarities between the East & West?

Can they identify the differences and similarities in
characters?

Role Play: Can students execute each scene by demonstrating the
differences and similarities between the East & West and
the characters?

Students answer questions and comment on role plays
with thoughtful reflection

Closure: Students are able to provide 2 characteristics for each:
Greaser and Soc

Students hand in 1 pg. Journal Entry (Lesson 4 homework)

LESSON 6: Staying Gold!

Theme: Innocence vs. Experience

Learning Outcomes:
- apply various strategies to generate and shape ideas
- demonstrate pride and satisfaction in using language to create and
express their thoughts, ideas, and feelings

Objectives: (SWBAT)
- review assigned chapters from the point-of-view of the characters
- interpret Robert Frost’s poem recited by Ponyboy
- develop creative skills through an artistic (visual) interpretation of
the poem

Plan:
(1) Hook: Outsiders Crossword Puzzle (attached)
10 m.
(2) Discussion (Chp. 4 & 5):
Why do you think Johnny killed Bob?
Do you think you would have reacted
differently?
What could have been some
alternatives?
If you were Ponyboy and Johnny,
whom would you turn to for help? Why
do you think they went to Dally?
Why do you think Ponyboy and
Johnny’s situation prompted
Ponyboy’s recitation of “Nothing Gold
Can Stay?”
Who is innocent? Who has experience?
(all characters)
20 m.
(3) Read excerpts from p. 54-56 and 76-77 and then discuss
Robert Frost’s poem
20 m.
(4) Question period: interpretation of poem
10-15 m.
(5) Writing Assignment: Write a 1-page description about
your interpretation of Frost’s poem to be displayed in
portfolio. Start in class, to be completed for homework.
10 m.
(6) Closure: Is Dally innocent or experienced? What about
the rest of the Greasers?
4 m.
(7) Homework/Agenda: Poem interpretation (1 pages)
3 m.
Assessment:
Discussion: Can student’s rationalize why and why
not Johnny should have killed Bob?
Students discover alternatives to using
knife.
Students address Ponyboy’s
interpretation of the poem
Writing Assignment: Student’s demonstrate an
understanding to the poem and
interpret its meaning in a written form
in relation to novel themes.
Closure: Can students address the difference
between innocence and experience
with all of the Greasers?

LESSON 7: This is who I am.
Theme: Biography & Autobiography
Learning Outcomes:
- demonstrate pride and satisfaction in using language to create and
express their thoughts, ideas, and feelings
Objectives: (SWBAT)
- explore self-identity and enhance self-esteem
- explore Ponyboy’s identity through biography
- explore self identity through autobiography
- openly communicate their autobiography
- build up to the final project for portfolio
Plan:
(1) Hook: “Tuff Time”, Finish the following statements: The
best thing about me is …, and the worst thing about me is
…?
10 m.
(2) Share answers with partner
Explain why you chose those best things and worst
things
5 m.
(3) In groups of 3 or 4, write a biography poem for Ponyboy
See attached sheet
10 m.
(4) Each group presents their Ponyboy Biography Poem
Explain why you chose the ideas for lines 4 through 10
15 m.
(5) Discussion:
How does your identity relate to Ponyboy’s?
What are there similarities? Differences?
Do others (characters in the novel) see Ponyboy as
you described him in the poem?
How important is it to celebrate your identity?
15 m.
(6) Present Final Project for Portfolio: Comparing Identities:
You vs. Who? (see portfolio handout for description)
10 m.
(7) Students check portfolios and make sure they are up to
date and all items required are inside the portfolio box. If
they are complete, the can start on homework or read
further in novel.
20 m.
(8) Closure: Exit Slip: What is a biography? How do they
represent a person’s identity?
4 m.
(9) Homework/Agenda: Outsiders Advertisement (due Lesson
9) assignment and read Chapter 6 & 7
3 m.
Assessment:
Autobiography poem: In what light do the students see
themselves?
Are they able to identify traits, emotions,
and feelings that help represent their
identity?
Ponyboy Biography Poem: Are students able to chose appropriate traits
and describe Ponyboy’s character and
identity through the poem?
Discussion: Can students understand and discuss the
similarities and differences between
themselves and Ponyboy?
Can students address the importance of
celebrating personal identity?
Closure: Can students identify the difference between
autobiography and biography?
Can they explain how both represent a
person’s identity?

LESSON 8: Are they heroes?
Theme: Heroism and the Media’s Portrayal
Lesson Outcomes:
- locate and interpret details in stories, articles, novels, poetry, or
non-print media to respond to a range of tasks
- identify and discuss the advantages and limitations of a variety of
media and explain their effects on people’s behaviour
Objectives: (SWBAT)
- define heroism and discuss it in relation to the events that occur in
Chapter 6 with Ponyboy, Johnny, and Dally
- discuss whether Ponyboy, Johnny, and Dally are heroes
- observe the effects of media and how it is sensationalist
- use critical thinking skills to get beneath the surface of media in the
novel and in society
- draw upon prior knowledge and experiences with media forms
Plan:
(1) Hook: Students will look at articles from the tabloids such
as The Enquirer, The Star, etc. and answer questions
about articles (see attached sheet)
10 m.
(2) Discussion: (Chapter 6)
What’s the difference between Cherry the Soc and
Cherry the Dreamer?
Why is Cherry going to say Johnny acted in selfdefence?
Why does Johnny decide to turn himself in?
Why did Ponyboy, Johnny run into the burning church
to save the kids?
Are Ponyboy, Johnny, and Dally heroes? Why or why
not?
p. 95 quote: How does this effect Ponyboy’s, Johnny’s,
and Dally’s identity?
How do we know that Darry does truly care for
Ponyboy?
What happens to the Curtis family?
20 m.
(3) Number students off: 1’s are Greasers and 2’s are Socs
2 m.
(4) Activity 1: In groups of 3 or 4 with either your Greasers
or Socs gangs, write a short newspaper article with a
catchy title about one of the two events below:
Johnny’s stabbing of Bob, or
Johnny and Ponyboy’s rescue of the children in the
church fire
20 m.
(5) In your groups, state whether you are a Greaser or a Soc
and present your article to the class (5 m. each)
15-20 m.
(6) Closure: How does media’s bias help to affect society’s
treatment of issues, individuals, and groups/gangs?
(relate back to hook)
5 m.
(7) Homework/Agenda: Read Chapter 8 & 9 for next class
5 m.
Assessment:
Hook: Can students identify the false media representation in
the newspapers such as The Enquirer, The Star?
Discussion: Are students able to realize that identities are
changing/altering in different characters?
Are they able to define heroism and understand the
concept of being called a hero?
Can they discuss whether Ponyboy, Johnny, and Dally are
heroes, and give thoughtful answers if they agree or
disagree with them being called heroes?
Activity 1: Can students write an interesting article from either the
point-of-view of a Greaser or a Soc, with a creative title
and touch upon the importance of either of the two
scenes to be described?
Closure: Can students determine a media bias? And the treatment
of people in society through media?

LESSON 9: The Family Factor
Theme: Influence of Family
Lesson Outcomes:
- create a variety of academic, technical, and personal
communications, including poems, stories, personal essays, oral
and written reports, group presentations, and informal
dramatizations
- use grammatically correct language when writing and speaking
Objectives: (SWBAT)
- examine the influence of family on characters
- develop an understanding of different types of family inside and
outside of the novel
- examine the influences of family on themselves
- explore and understand the influence of point-of-view (how it
affects one’s perception of a situation)
Plan:
(1) Hook: “Tuff Time”, How is each member of your family,
including yourself, unique and different? How do these
differences contribute to a stronger family? How does
your family influence you?
10 m.
(2) Activity 1: Role Play (see attached sheets) – each student
is given a role on a card. In groups, students discuss
attitudes and beliefs of characters and possible reactions
to situations
5 m.
(3) Groups “perform” role play in front of class
After each skit, discuss why they chose this
skit and why characters may have reacted in
certain ways
Influence of family in each skit?
20-25 m.
(4) Discussion: (Chp. 7, 8, & 9)
What did Ponyboy learn at the end of Chp. 6
about his family?
How does the Curtis family operate in their
house?
How are the gang (Steve, Two-Bit, Dally,
Johnny, etc.) family?
What threat does Juvenile court have on the
Curtis family?
How does Ponyboy’s dream affect his family?
How does Two-Bit explain “greasers” to
Ponyboy? p. 113
How does Randy’s talk with Ponyboy
demonstrate similarities in Greasers and
Socs?
At the beginning of Chp. 8, how do we know
Johnny’s condition is bad?
Why doesn’t Johnny want to see his mother?
What is Dally going to do with Two-Bit’s
switchblade?
Is Ponyboy sick? What is happening to him
at the end of Chp. 8?
Why is Cherry so worried about Ponyboy?
Why does she keep coming around?
p. 129 “sunset” quote – what is its
significance? How does it relate to p. 40-41
“We saw the same sunset.”
Why does Ponyboy want to help Cherry and
Randy?
What does “rumble” mean to each of the
Greasers?
Why does Dally take Ponyboy to the hospital
to see Johnny?
What is Dally going to do at the end of Chp.
9?
15 m.
(5) Worksheet on Chapters 7 – 9 (see attached sheet)
20 m.
(6) Closure: What are 5 ways a family can influence a
person?
4 m.
(7) Homework/Agenda: Read Chapters 10 & 11 for next
class and finish chp. 7 – 9 worksheet for next class
3 m.
Assessment:
Activity 1: During the role-play, are students able to demonstrate
the effects family have on identity and the influences they
have on everyday life through the characters in the story?
Discussion: Can the class identify the different roles of family and
types of family?
Can the class identify the uniqueness of the Curtis family?
The Greasers family?
Identity changes in novel. (Randy, Ponyboy, Two-Bit)
Closure: Can students address 5 ways a family can influence a
person?

LESSON 10: Take My Advice!
Theme: Crisis and Help
Learning Outcomes:
- identify personal strengths and goals related to using language and
use this information to set new goals
Objectives: (SWBAT)
- understand their own reactions to a crisis situation
- identify the different characters reactions to Johnny’s death
- understand the different ways to handle a crisis and parallel that to
how the characters in The Outsiders handled the crisis
Plan:
(1) Hook: Outsiders Language Game (see attached sheet)
10 m.
(2) Read p. 153-154 to the class
5 m.
(3) Discussion:
Why does Dally handle the situation the way he does?
How do Ponyboy and the other Greasers deal with
similar pressures?
How do you handle a crisis?
Where could Dally gone for help?
15 m.
(4) Activity 1: In groups of 3 or 4, brainstorm and make a list
of places you can go for help in your community. Answer
the questions on the worksheet (see attached sheet)
20-25 m.
(5) Discussion: (Chp. 10 & 11)
What should Ponyboy, Johnny, and Dally done?
What about the other Greasers, what should they have
done?
Who is to blame for Dally death? The Socs? The
Greasers? Johnny? Who?
Should Ponyboy have taken part in the rumble? (sick,
fever, concussion, etc.)
Why did Johnny leave Gone With The Wind for
Ponyboy?
What significance does Gone With The Wind have for
Johnny? For the novel?
Why does Randy come to see Ponyboy? P. 163-166
Why does Ponyboy say that he had the knife and killed
Bob?
Why does Ponyboy think that Johnny is not dead?
15 m.
(6) Closure: What is the best thing to do in a crisis? Who
would be a good person to talk to if you are involved in
something you don’t think you can handle?
5 m.
(7) Homework/Agenda: Read Chp. 12 for next class, remind
class that they will be watching the movie The Outsiders
next class
5 m.
Assessment:
Discussion: How does the class react to Dally’s death?
Can they suggest any ways of going about the situation
differently? (rationalize)
Activity 1: What sort of lists do the students create for crisis and
help?
Do they understand the importance of talking to someone
if they are involved directly or indirectly in a crisis?
Discussion: Have the student’s read Chp. 10 & 11? Are they able to
participate in classroom discussion and answers
questions?
Can they summarize each other’s points?
Closure: Handling a crisis

LESSON 11: “Nothing Gold Can Stay”
Theme: What is Gold?
Lesson Outcomes:
- interpret and report on information obtained from more than one
source to inform others
- explain the motivation of the characters in works of
communication, providing evidence from the text of each work
Objectives: (SWBAT)
- discuss Johnny’s interpretation of Robert Frost’s poem
- discuss the significance of Johnny’s letter to Ponyboy
- relate their own interpretation of the poem to Ponyboy’s and
Johnny’s interpretations
Plan:
(1) Hook: Outsiders Word Search (attached)
5 m.
(2) Read p. 178-179, Johnny’s letter to Ponyboy
5 m.
(3) Discussion:
What changes Johnny’s outlook on death?
Is he happy to die? Proud?
Why doesn’t Johnny mind dying?
What is his advice to Ponyboy?
Why do you think none of the Greasers told Johnny
about Dally’s death?
“he meant you’re gold when you’re a kid, like green” –
What is Johnny saying?
What is the significance of sunsets? It is discussed a
few times throughout the novel, what could it
symbolize?
Why does Hinton repeat the same lines at the end of
the novel as she begins the novel with?
What is the significance of this?
What does it tell us about Pony?
What does the novel Gone With The Wind have to do
with the theme of the novel? The poem?
15 m.
(4) The Outsiders movie, by Francis Ford Coppola
Movie focus: How are the characters portrayed? Do
they stay true their descriptions in the novel?
50 m.
(5) Closure: Student’s answer movie focus on an exit slip
5 m.
(6) Homework/Agenda: Work on final project, which will be
due next class, and any other work that is not finished
that needs to go into Portfolio Box
Assessment:
Discussion: Can students answer the questions reflectively in regards
to Johnny’s death, Johnny’s letter to Ponyboy, and
Ponyboy’s theme assignment for school?
Closure: Movie focus: Are students able to see the differences and
similarities between the movie and the novel?

LESSON 12: The End: Outsiders Portfolio
Theme: “Tuff Time”
Lesson Outcomes:
- interpret and report on information obtained from more than one
source to inform others
- explain the motivation of the characters in works of
communication, providing evidence from the text of each work
Objectives: (SWBAT)
- discuss the differences between the novel and the movie
- critique the movie and decide which genre they preferred for the
story of The Outsiders
- assess their own work in their portfolios
- take pride in their portfolio work and share with their peers
Plan:
(1) Hook: Get ready for the second half of the movie.
Introduce critique idea, student can either chose to be a
Greaser or a Soc and critique the movie
5 m.
(2) The Outsiders movie
45 m.
(3) “Tuff Time” journal entry. Did you enjoy the movie? Why
or why not? Who was your favourite character(s) and
why? Who was your least favourite character(s)?
5 m.
(4) Activity 1: Sharing of Portfolios
Students will share their portfolio boxes with one
another
Students will chose their 3 best “Tuff Time” journal
entries and put a sticker on all three, the teacher will
only look at the best 3 in detail, the rest glanced at
quickly
Add their final project into portfolio box and make sure
name and block are on box
20-25 m.
(5) Closure: Would you recommend The Outsiders to your
family or friends to read? Would you tell them to read the
book or see the movie?
5 m.
(6) Cleanup: End of The Outsiders unit!
2 m.
Assessment:
“Tuff Time” Can students provide a thought-provoking review of the
movie and describe their favourite and least favourite
characters?
Activity 1: Are students enjoying sharing their Portfolios with their
peers?
Are they able to self-assess their work and take pride in
their work?
Closure: Are students willing to share their experience of The
Outsiders with friends and family?
Which do they recommend? The novel or the movie?
Name: ___________ Date: _____________
Block: ___________

LESSON 1: Outside Identity!
Base Information Background: (LESSON 1)
Identity:
1. The collective aspect of the set of characteristics by which a
thing is definitively recognizable or known
2. The set of behavioural or personal characteristics by which an
individual is recognizable as a member of a group.
3. The quality or condition of being the same as something else.
4. The distinct personality of an individual regarded as a
persisting entity; individuality.
Class:
1. To arrange, group, or rate according to qualities or
characteristics; assign to a class; classify.
Race:
1. A group of people united or classified together on the basis of
common history, nationality, or geographic distribution
Individuality:
1.
a. The aggregate of qualities and characteristics that distinguish
one person or thing from others; character: choices that were
intended to express his individuality; monotonous towns lacking
in individuality.
b. An individual or distinguishing feature.
Clique:
1. A small exclusive group of friends or associates.
Gang:
1. A group of criminals or hoodlums who band together for mutual
protection and profit.
2. A group of adolescents who band together, especially a group of
delinquents.
Name: ___________ Date: _____________
Block: ___________

The Outsiders (LESSON 1 & 2)
Synopsis:
According to Ponyboy, there are two kinds of people in the world: greasers
and socs. A soc (short for "social") has money, can get away with just about
anything, and has an attitude longer than a limousine. A greaser, on the
other hand, always lives on the outside and needs to watch his back.
Ponyboy is a greaser, and he's always been proud of it, even willing to
rumble against a gang of socs for the sake of his fellow greasers--until one
terrible night when his friend Johnny kills a soc. The murder gets under
Ponyboy's skin, causing his world to crumble and teaching him that pain feels
the same whether a soc or a greaser.
S.E. Hinton:
When she was seventeen, she published The
Outsiders, a story about the greasers and the rich kids
in high school. Because she often writes from a boy’s
point of view, she uses her initials S.E. instead of her
name Susan Eloise. She explains, “I figured that most
boys would look at the book and think, ‘What can a
chick know about stuff like that?’”
The Outsiders, by S.E. Hinton, captures the adolescent angst of
eighth-grade students. As they study this novel, students delve into
themes that mirror what they see in their daily lives: family, sacrifice,
community, identity, prejudice, rites of passage, and strife. After
identifying literary components of the novel, students complete selfselected
projects such as photo essays or video poems that
demonstrate a mastery of its themes. Technology empowers the
students to take charge of their own learning from the literature.
Name: ___________ Date: _____________
Block: ___________

1960s Background: (LESSON 2)
Language:
A Gas
A lot of fun.
All show and no go.
Referenced to a car that had all the pretty chrome goodies, but
wouldn't get out of its own way.
Bad
Awesome.
Badass
A tough guy. A guy you really don't want to mess with.
Bag
To Steal. Example: Who bagged my towel? ; also see Score
Also; "What's your bag" meaning what's your problem or where are
you coming from.
Blitzed
Drunk
Cruising
Driving up and down the same street looking for races, girls, guys, etc.
Deuce
A 1932 Ford. As in, "She's my Little Deuce Coupe, you don't know
what I got".
Dude
In the 60's, a dude was a geek or a panty waist.
Pad
Someone's house. Example: There wasn't much to do so we all hung
out at John's pad, drank Cokes and listened to records.
Thongs
In the 60's, thongs were something you wore on your feet.
Music:
Beatles
Elvis Presley
Chubby Checker
The Everly Brothers
Frank Sinatra
Movies:
Psycho
The Alamo
The Time Machine
The Magnificent Seven
Name: ___________ Date: _____________
Block: ___________
News Headlines from 1960s:
Kennedy Wins Presidency, Democrats Sweep Congress
Two White Public Schools are the First to Integrate
Russian Astronaut Yuri Gayarin First Man in Space Circles Globe
East Germans Build Berlin Wall, Tensions Rise
Yo-Yos Become National Craze
Name: ___________ Date: _____________
Block: ___________

LESSON 2
Gender and Identity in Magazines
1. Find two advertisements from your magazines. These
advertisements must include representations of people.
2. Examine how men and women are portrayed in the
advertisements.
~How are differences shown?
~What ideals are created? What identity is created?
Name: ___________ Date: _____________
Block: ___________
3. Consider these questions:
~How do you, as a male or female, relate to the images?
~Are they "true" to you?
Name: ___________ Date: _____________
Block: ___________
Photos from the 1960s (LESSON 2)
Women’s fashion:
Name: ___________ Date: _____________
Block: ___________
A couple from the 1960s
An old Ford truck from 1956
A group of popular cars from the 1960s
Name: ___________ Date: _____________
Block: ___________

LESSON 3:
NAME IDENTITY
Write a Name Identity poem for Ponyboy. Use each letter of Ponyboy’s
name (like shown below) to create a sentence or single noun, verb, or
adjective that describes Pony’s identity. Refer to Chapter 1 for
character information.
P _____________________________
o _____________________________
n _____________________________
y _____________________________
b _____________________________
o _____________________________
y _____________________________


Name: ___________ Date: _____________
Block: ___________
Portfolio Activities
*Students must complete all of the following six activities:
1. Magazine Worksheet:
- use magazines to find articles that demonstrate gender roles and
identity
- examine the roles women and men play in magazines and respond
to a series of questions
2. “Tuff Time:
- write on journal entries prompts that reflect on themes in novel
- relate personal identity and reflections with the novel and themes
3. Name Identity:
- write a Name Identity poem for Ponyboy, describing his identity
and the characteristics that make him unique
- use adjectives, nouns, and verbs that describe Ponyboy’s identity
- create a interesting and imaginative poem
4. Writing Entry: Personal Reflection
- write a personal journal entry about a particular even that has
impacted your life and has shaped who you are. Include a photo,
drawing, or object that represents this event and explain why you
chose the item.
5. Comparing Identities: You vs. Who? (Final Project – marked
separately from portfolio)
- choose a character from The Outsiders who you feel you can relate
with in terms of identity and personality
- OR choose a character who you feel you cannot relate with at all,
for example, they are the complete opposite in identity and
personality from you


Name: ___________ Date: _____________
Block: ___________
- compare and contrast that character’s identity to your own identity
Would you both be in the same clique? Or different
cliques?
What characteristics are similar between you both? What
characteristics are different? Why are they similar or
different?
Use the previous assignments on self-identity and
character charts for additional information when
comparing and contrasting
- create a timeline of the characters development throughout the
novel
plot their growth in terms of identity, self-reflection,
maturity, etc.
plot their mistakes and their accomplishments
make sure you demonstrate and explain the character’s
growth, maturity, reflection, etc. through your choice of
genre
be creative and use pictures, words, symbols, etc. to plot
the characters timeline
- choose a creative and imaginative way to demonstrate your
knowledge of the character of your choice and your comparison
with your own identity
- some examples for the project are: a poster board with pictures,
phrases, quotes from the novel, poetry, objects/items that
demonstrate the differences and similarities between you and the
character you chose; write a journal from the character’s point-ofview
and then compare that to a journal about you, or another
type of genre (poem, artefacts, etc.)
Some questions to keep in mind while completing the final project
*How is identity demonstrated in your choice of character?
*How does the identity of the main character similar to/different from
Ponyboy's? What factors influence this?
*How does this novel or movie help you explore your own identity?
*How can you demonstrate the differences and similarities between you and
the character you chose using different types of medium (media, drama,
poetry, essay, journal, etc.)


Name: ___________ Date: _____________
Block: ___________
Portfolio Rubric

Clear, Well-Organized Arrangement of Assigned Requirements:
5 ~ Excellent - Consistently communicates ideas in a clear, well-organized,
coherent fashion throughout portfolio.
4 ~ Good - Often communicates ideas in a clear, well-organized, coherent
fashion throughout portfolio.
3 ~ Acceptable - Communicates ideas in a clear, well-organized, coherent
fashion throughout most of the portfolio.
2 ~ Poor - Sometimes fails to communicate ideas in a clear, well-organized,
coherent fashion throughout most of the portfolio.
1 ~ Very Poor - Often fails to communicate ideas in a clear, well-organized,
coherent fashion throughout all of the portfolio.

Appropriate Use of Requirements Considering the Intended Purpose:
5 ~ Excellent - Is exceptionally tailored to express identity and to relate to
The Outsiders throughout the portfolio, indicating a high level of reflection.
4 ~ Good - Is consistently tailored to express identity and to relate to The
Outsiders throughout the portfolio, indicating an above average level of
reflection.
3 ~ Acceptable - Is tailored to express identity and to relate to The Outsiders
throughout most of the portfolio, indication an average level of reflection.
2 ~ Poor - Sometimes fails to be tailored to express identity and to relate to
The Outsiders throughout most of the portfolio, indication little reflection.
1 ~ Very Poor - Often fails to be tailored to express identity and to relate to
The Outsiders throughout all of the portfolio, indicating no reflection.
Name: ___________ Date: _____________
Block: ___________

Use of a Variety of Creative Genres
5 ~ Excellent - Exceptionally uses a variety of genres that are highly creative
considering the topic and its intended purpose.
4 ~ Good - Consistently uses a variety of genres that are creative at an
above average level considering the topic and its intended purpose.
3 ~ Acceptable - Uses a variety of genres that are creative on an average
level throughout most of the portfolio considering the topic and its intended
purpose.
2 ~ Poor - Sometimes fails to use a variety of genres that are creative
demonstrating that there was no consideration of the topic and its intended
purpose throughout most of the portfolio.
1 ~ Very Poor - Often fails to use a variety of genres that are creative
demonstrating that there was no consideration of the topic and its intended
purpose throughout any of the portfolio.

Free From Spelling, Punctuation, and Grammar Errors:
5 ~ Excellent - Consistently is free from spelling, punctuation, and grammar
errors in all of the portfolio's content.
4 ~ Good - Often is free from spelling, punctuation, and grammar errors in
the portfolio's content.
3 ~ Acceptable - Free from spelling, punctuation, and grammar errors
throughout most of the portfolio's content.
2 ~ Poor - Is often plagued by errors in spelling, punctuation, and grammar
errors throughout all of the portfolio's content.
1 ~ Very Poor - Is entirely plagued by errors in spelling, punctuation, and
grammar throughout all of the portfolio's content.

Overall Evaluation:
The portfolio will be out of 100 marks, taking each of the rubric categories
(there are 4) and evaluating the student’s portfolio and then multiplying that
number by 5. Each section (there are 4) will be marked out of 25, making
the whole portfolio out of 100 marks.


Name: ___________ Date: _____________
Block: ___________
LESSON 4
WRITING ENTRY
Personal Reflection
Write a 1-page journal entry about a particular even that has impacted
your life and has shaped who you are. Include a photo, drawing, or
object that represents this event and explain why you chose the item.
Who Am I?
__________________________________________________
__________________________________________________
__________________________________________________
__________________________________________________
__________________________________________________
__________________________________________________
__________________________________________________
__________________________________________________
__________________________________________________
__________________________________________________
__________________________________________________
__________________________________________________
__________________________________________________
__________________________________________________
__________________________________________________
__________________________________________________
__________________________________________________
__________________________________________________
__________________________________________________
__________________________________________________
__________________________________________________
__________________________________________________
__________________________________________________
__________________________________________________
__________________________________________________
__________________________________________________
__________________________________________________
__________________________________________________
__________________________________________________
__________________________________________________
__________________________________________________


Name: ___________ Date: _____________
Block: ___________
LESSON 5:
ID CARD: Role Play
Students, in groups of 3 or 4, will role play different scenes from Chapters 2
and 3 to demonstrate different characters identities and personalities. The
students will chose who will play each of the characters in the scene and one
student will play the narrator.
Role Play 1:
p. 21 - 22
“Take your feet off my chair …” to “I shook my head, wide-eyed. “No.””
Role Play 2:
p. 22 – 23
“Suddenly she smiled.” to “. . . but you could hardly say it about Soda.”
Role Play 3:
p. 24 – 25
“Dally came striding back . . .” to “From what I saw, you do.”
Role Play 4:
p. 28 – 29
“Hey, where is ol’ Dally, anyways?” to “He pays up. No sweat.”
Role Play 5:
p. 32 – 33
“Somehow the gang sensed . . .” to “”It’s okay, Johnnycake, they’re gone
now. It’s okay.”
Role Play 6:
p. 38 – 39
“Rat race is a perfect name . . .” to “Till I met Cherry Valance.”
Role Play 7:
p. 45 – 56
“Two-Bit took a long drag . . .” to “I hope I never see him again, or I will.”
Role Play 8:
p. 49 – 50
“Where the heck have you been?” to “His eyes were huge. Ponyboy . . .”
*each identity will be on a card with the Role Play number on it and a
quick description of the setting
Name: ___________ Date: _____________
Block: ___________


LESSON 6:
Nothing Gold Can Stay
Robert Frost
��
Nature's first green is gold,
Her hardest hue to hold.
Her early leaf's a flower;
But only so an hour.
Then leaf subsides to leaf.
So Eden sank to grief,
So dawn goes down to day.
Nothing gold can stay.
Assignment:
Write a 1-page interpretation about Robert Frost’s poem “Nothing Gold Can
Stay”. Refer back to Ponyboy’s description and recitation of the poem in
Chapter 5.
Name: ___________ Date: _____________
Block: ___________


LESSON 7:
BIOGRAPHY POEM
Write a biographical poem about Ponyboy using the following
structure:
Line 1: His first name only
Line 2: 4 traits that describe him
Line 3: Daughter/Son of~OR Sibling of~
Line 4: Who loves~(3 items, places, or people)
Line 5: Who feels~(3 items)
Line 6: Who needs~(3 items)
Line 7: Who gives~(3 items)
Line 8: Who fears~(3 items)
Line 9: Who would like to see~(3 items)
Line 10: Who lives in~
Line 11: His last name only


Ponyboy Bio Poem
Name: ___________ Date: _____________
Block: ___________

LESSON 8:
MEDIA SCHMEDIA
Refer to the article you have been given from such magazines as The
Enquirer, The Star, and The National Examiner and answer the questions.
Is the article you read interesting? How did or didn’t it keep your interest?
How is the article reliable? How isn’t it reliable?
What information or writing style makes the article false?
How is this effective journalism?
Name: ___________ Date: _____________
Block: ___________
Do you think the public should have newspapers like the one your article
came from?
How would this article influence you? Would you follow its advice or believe
its material?
Name: ___________ Date: _____________
Block: ___________


LESSON 8:
GREASER/SOC JOURNALISM
Write a newspaper article from the point of view or either a Greaser or a Soc
about one of the two following events:
Johnny’s stabbing of Bob, or
Johnny and Ponyboy’s rescue of the children in the
church fire
Create a catchy and imaginative title and check for spelling and grammar.
Remember to look in the text, Chapter 4 and Chapter 6, for useful
information to include and influence your article.
Name: ___________ Date: _____________
Block: ___________


LESSON 9:
ROLE PLAY – THE FAMILY FACTOR
In groups of 3 or 4, students will role-play the given situations. Students will
create their own role-play scene about the situation. They can use
information and dialogue from the novel.
Group 1: Ponyboy
Discuss the following situation: Johnny killing Bob.
Group 1: Darry
Discuss the following situation: Johnny killing Bob.
Group 1: Sodapop
Discuss the following situation: Johnny killing Bob.
Group 2: Cherry Valence
Discuss the following situation: Cherry's father sees her with Dally,
Johnny, and Ponyboy after the movies.
Group 2: Cherry's father
Discuss the following situation: Cherry's father sees her with Dally,
Johnny, and Ponyboy after the movies.
Group 3: Dally
Discuss the following situation: Johnny's parents vs. Johnny's
"family" in the gang.
Group 3: Johnny
Discuss the following situation: Johnny's parents vs. Johnny's
"family" in the gang.


Name: ___________ Date: _____________
Block: ___________
Group 4: Ponyboy
Discuss the following: Ponyboy and Johnny running away.
Group 4: Darry
Discuss the following: Ponyboy and Johnny running away.
Group 4: Sodapop
Discuss the following: Ponyboy and Johnny running away.
Group 5: Johnny
Discuss the following: Johnny killing Bob.
Group 5: Johnny's mother
Discuss the following: Johnny killing Bob.
Group 5: Johnny's father
Discuss the following: Johnny killing Bob.
Group 6: Ponyboy
Discuss the following: the tension at home.
Group 6: Johnny
Discuss the following: the tension at home.
Group 6: Dally
Discuss the following: the tension at home.
Group 7: Mother of a rescued child
Discuss the following: your child's rescue from the church fire by
Johnny and Ponyboy.


Name: ___________ Date: _____________
Block: ___________
Group 7: Father of a rescued child
Discuss the following: your child's rescue from the church fire by
Johnny and Ponyboy.
Group 8: Randy (the Soc)
Discuss the following: Randy's involvement in the fight and the
killing of Bob.
Group 8: Randy's mother
Discuss the following: Randy's involvement in the fight and the
killing of Bob.
Group 8: Randy's father
Discuss the following: Randy's involvement in the fight and the
killing of Bob.
Group 9: Ponyboy
Discuss the following: the future of the family of brothers.


Name: ___________ Date: _____________
Block: ___________
LESSON 9:
CHAPTERS 7-9 QUESTIONS:
Answer the questions by using the novel. Provide evidence with page
numbers and quotes. Answer in complete sentences.
What did Ponyboy learn at the end of Chapter 6 about his family?
What threat does Juvenile court have on the Curtis family? If the judge
decides to separate Ponyboy, Sodapop, and Darry, how would it affect each
of the boys?
How does Two-Bit explain “greasers” to Ponyboy? (p. 113) What influence
does this have on Ponyboy?
Name: ___________ Date: _____________
Block: ___________
How does Randy’s talk with Ponyboy demonstrate similarities in Greasers and
Socs?
Why is Cherry so worried about Ponyboy? Why does she keep coming
around? What significance does her talk with Ponyboy have on Ponyboy’s
feelings towards the “rumble?”
What does “rumble” mean to each of the Greasers? How is having a “rumble”
going to solve the problems between the Greasers and Socs?
Name: ___________ Date: _____________
Block: ___________


LESSON 10:
OUTSIDERS LANGUAGE GAME
Divide the class into 2 groups, Greasers and Socs. Each group takes turns
guessing the meaning of 1960s language terms.
A Gas
A lot of fun.
All show and no go.
Referenced to a car that had all the pretty chrome goodies, but
wouldn't get out of its own way.
Bad
Awesome.
Badass
A tough guy. A guy you really don't want to mess with.
Bag
To Steal. Example: Who bagged my towel? ; also see Score
Also; "What's your bag" meaning what's your problem or where are
you coming from.
Blitzed
Drunk
Cruising
Driving up and down the same street looking for races, girls, guys, etc.
Deuce
A 1932 Ford. As in, "She's my Little Deuce Coupe, you don't know
what I got".
Dude
In the 60's, a dude was a geek or a pantywaist.
Pad
Someone's house. Example: There wasn't much to do so we all hung
out at John's pad, drank Cokes and listened to records.
Thongs
In the 60's, thongs were something you wore on your feet.
Name: ___________ Date: _____________
Block: ___________


LESSON 10:
OUTSIDE CRISIS
A crisis can come at the most unexpected time. They can be big or small, but
the best advice is . . .
Who can we turn to when we encounter a crisis?
What community services can help you during a crisis?
Would you tell an adult about a problem that you are unable to resolve or
attempt to fix? Why or why not?
How would you help a friend in need? Would you seek an adult for help?
Name: ___________ Date: _____________
Block: ___________


LESSON 6:
OUTSIDERS CROSSWORD PUZZLE
ACROSS:
1. a type of clothing that only the Socs wear and the Greasers envy.
3. she was only 16 years old when she wrote the story
5. Dally sent Johnny and Ponyboy to this city after Johnny killed Bob.
7. the main theme in The Outsiders
9. these people have long hair and live on the East side
10. the oldest Curtis brother
13. he had a horse named Mickey Mouse
15. he used to live in New York before coming back to Tulsa
16. it’s the one thing that both the Greasers and the Socs have can see
DOWN:
2. her hair was fiery red, and so was her car
4. the title of the novel we are reading
6. it happen always happens between the Greasers and the Socs
8. Mrs. O’Briant called Ponyboy, Johnny and Dally this (hint chp. 6)
11. these people are rich, drive hotrods and live on the West side
12. Mr. Syme’s student called him late at night and asked him about the
theme he was to write about. His name is? (hint chp. 12)
14. Dally loved this person more than anything
17. Bob drove this kind of car


Name: ___________ Date: _____________
Block: ___________
RESOURCES:
Books:
Hinton, S.E. The Outsiders. Toronto, ON: Penguin, 1967.
Stanket, Lou Willet. A Teacher’s Guide to The Paperback Editions of the
Novels of S.E. Hinton. (UBC Education Library, call #: PS 3558I547Z83
1980). New York, NY: Dell, 1975.
Steffen, Donna. Adapted/Modified Materials for Writing Output: Supporting
the novel: The Outsiders by S.E. Hinton. (UBC call #: PS
3558I548O938 1997). White Rock, BC: Davies and Johnson, 1997.
Websites:
http://falcon.jmu.edu/~ramseyil/hinton.htm
http://www.sehinton.com/
http://cougartown.com/slang.html (1960s language)
http://www.1960sflashback.com/
http://www.fsu.edu/~CandI/ENGLISH/webquests/outsiders2.htm
http://www.sdcoe.k12.ca.us/score/out/outtg.html
For the Media Schmedia Activity, I am using articles from The National
Examiner, which is very similar to The Enquirer and such genre. The articles I
have chosen are funny and interesting, in hopes it will create some critical
evaluation and thinking about the media and its influences on us.
I created my own Word Search and Crossword Puzzles, it was very easy. You
can find templates online and then build your own to suit your needs.


Name: ___________ Date: _____________
Block: ___________
COMPARING IDENTITIES: YOU VS. WHO?
RUBRIC
Overall Evaluation:
5 ~ Excellent - Consistently communicates ideas in a clear, well-organized,
coherent fashion throughout final project.
4 ~ Good - Often communicates ideas in a clear, well-organized, coherent
fashion throughout final project.
3 ~ Acceptable - Communicates ideas in a clear, well-organized, coherent
fashion throughout most of the final project.
2 ~ Poor - Sometimes fails to communicate ideas in a clear, well-organized,
coherent fashion throughout most of the final project.
1 ~ Very Poor - Often fails to communicate ideas in a clear, well-organized,
coherent fashion throughout all of the final project.
Multiply score by 2, to obtain grade out of 10.
Comparing of Identities In-depth:
5 ~ Excellent - Is exceptionally tailored to express identity and to relate to
The Outsiders throughout the project as well as examining the similarities
and differences between themselves and a chosen character, indicating a
high level of reflection.
4 ~ Good - Is consistently tailored to express identity and to relate to The
Outsiders throughout the project as well as examining the similarities and
differences between themselves and a chosen character, indicating an above
average level of reflection.
3 ~ Acceptable - Is tailored to express identity and to relate to The Outsiders
throughout most of the project as well as examining the similarities and
differences between themselves and a chosen character, indication an
average level of reflection.


Name: ___________ Date: _____________
Block: ___________
2 ~ Poor - Sometimes fails to be tailored to express identity and to relate to
The Outsiders throughout most of the project as well as sometimes fails to
examine the similarities and differences between themselves and a chosen
character, indication little reflection.
1 ~ Very Poor - Often fails to be tailored to express identity and to relate to
The Outsiders throughout all of the project and fails to examine the
similarities and differences between themselves and a chosen character,
indicating no reflection.
Multiply score by 2, to obtain grade out of 10

Creativity:
5 ~ Excellent – Student demonstrated exceptional knowledge and personal
reflection in an interesting, exciting, and creative fashion. Utilizing different
types of genre and reflection to portray ideas about identity and The
Outsiders.
4 ~ Good – Student demonstrated consistent knowledge and personal
reflection in an interesting, exciting, and creative fashion. Utilizing different
types of genre and reflection to portray ideas about identity and The
Outsiders.
3 ~ Acceptable – Student demonstrated basic knowledge and personal
reflection in an interesting, exciting, and creative fashion. Utilizing different
types of genre and reflection to portray ideas about identity and The
Outsiders.
2 ~ Poor – Student sometimes failed to demonstrate basic knowledge and
personal reflection in an interesting, exciting, and creative fashion. Utilizing
different types of genre and reflection to portray ideas about identity and The
Outsiders.
1 ~ Very Poor – Student often failed to demonstrate basic knowledge and
personal reflection in an interesting, exciting, and creative fashion. Utilizing
different types of genre and reflection to portray ideas about identity and The
Outsiders.
Multiply score by 2, to obtain grade out of 10
Total Evaluation:
Project will be marked out of 30 marks and worth 30% of unit mark.










Two Week Unit Plan for



The Outsiders

By S.E. Hinton





Prepared by Miss N. Santuccio
8th Grade Language Arts













Methods of English - 571
Dr. L. Nicosia
December 8, 2008

Day One: Introducing The Outsiders


Objectives:
·         As a pre-reading strategy, students will set a purpose for reading, make and adjust predictions, ask essential questions, relate new learning to background experiences, and respond to anticipatory questions.
·      During the lesson students will demonstrate active listening behaviors in a variety of situations and by analyzing information, ideas, and opinions to determine relevancy.
·      Students will develop and refine an extended vocabulary through listening and exposure to a variety of texts and independent reading.
·      Students will clarify word meanings through the use of a word’s definition, example, restatement, or contrast.

NJCCCS: 3.1.8.E.1; 3.4.8.A.1-2; 3.1.8.F.1-2

Materials: Copies of Letter from S.E. Hinton (+ transparency or on computer projector screen), The Outsiders

Introduction:
(Students should be taking notes throughout discussion)
The Outsiders was written by a teenager about teenagers.  The author, Susan Eloise Hinton, began writing the story when she was 15-years-old and it was finally published when she was 17-years-old, in 1967.  She was advised to use a pen name, S.E. Hinton, because the publisher did not think that people would believe that a girl wrote this novel!  Hinton began writing the story in response to an act of teenage violence that occurred in her hometown.  The setting of the novel, Oklahoma in the 1960s, is the same setting in which Hinton wrote the book.  Considered a coming-of-age novel, The Outsiders examines many social and teenage issues that were prevalent in the 1960s and are still issues today.

Discussion Questions:
What do you think “The Outsiders” means?  What is an “outsider”?
What do you think a “coming-of-age” novel means?
What do you think were some of the issues teenagers faced in the 1960s?
Do you think these are issues that teenagers still face today?

Letter from S.E. Hinton
(Show letter on projector, distribute handouts; have class read aloud)

Discussion Questions:
What kinds of characters do you think you will encounter while reading The Outsiders?
What kinds of themes do you think you will encounter while reading The Outsiders?
What do you think the author wants you to take away from this novel?

Vocabulary Assignment
Explain to students that they will be keeping track of new vocabulary words they come across in each chapter of the novel.  Students must record at least 3 new words from each of the chapters.  They must write the word, its complete definition, and the quote from the book which uses the word (with citatation) in their notebooks.  Each reading HW assignment will be accompanied by this Vocabulary Assignment and completion will be checked and recorded each day reading is assigned for HW.  This will count as a HW grade.  At the end of the novel, each student will submit their vocabulary, a master list of 20-30 words will be compiled and distributed.  Students will then be tested on the vocabulary.  Details regarding the test will be explained when Master Vocabulary List is distributed.

Class Reading: Chapter 1
Time permitting: Begin reading with class until period it is over.

Homework: Read Chapter 1 (1-18) & Vocabulary (due tomorrow)

Dear Reader,
It is very difficult for me to write about myself, and especially The Outsiders, which was written at a horrendous time in my life, was published by a series of mind-boggling synchronicities, and has gone further than any author dared dream.  But I’ll give it a shot.
                I wrote The Outsiders when I was sixteen years old.  Actually I began it when I was fifteen, as a short story about a boy who as beaten up on his way home from the movies.
                But I didn’t just write The Outsiders, I lived it.  Looking back, I realize how important it was to me to have another life at that time.  To be someone else.  To deal with the problems I had to face, and write my way to some sort of understanding and coping.  This is all in hindsight.  At the time, I was mad about the social situation in my high school.  I desperately wanted something to read that dealt realistically with teen-age life.
                I  knew I was going to be a writer.  I love to write.  I began in grade school, because I loved to read, and liked the idea of making stories happen the way I wanted them to.  By the time I was in high school I had been practicing for years.  So I was both elated and not surprised when I received my publishing contract on the day I graduated from high school.
                ….
                Fans.  I receive letters from every state, from dozens of foreign countries.  From twelve-year-olds and forty-year-olds.  From convicts and policemen, teachers, social workers, and of course, kids.  Kids who are living like those in The Outsiders.  Kids who can’t imagine living lives like those in The Outsiders.  Kids who read all the time.  Ones who never before finished a book.
                The letters saying “I loved the book” are good, the ones that say “I never liked to read before, and now I read all them” are better, but the ones that say “The Outsiders changed my life” and “I read it fifteen years ago and I realize how much it has influenced my life choices” frankly scare me.  Who am I to change anyone’s life?  I guess the best reply is “It’s the book, not the author” and “It’s the message, not the messenger.”  A lot of the time I feel that The Outsiders was meant to be written, and I was chosen to write it.  It’s certainly done more good than anything I could accomplish on a personal level.
                If this sounds like I am overwhelmed by the decades of incredible response to what began as a short story I started when I was fifteen years old, well, I guess that’s the truth.

Stay Gold.
S.E. Hinton


Taken from the Author’s Foreword in The Outsiders Speak Platinum Edition, published by Penguin Group (1995)




Name___________________________________________     Period__________    Date_________

Directions: Please respond to the questions below regarding the poem.  Responses must be at least 5 sentences long.

Nothing Gold Can Stay
by Robert Frost

Nature's first green is gold,
Her hardest hue to hold.
Her early leaf's a flower;
But only so an hour.
Then leaf subsides to leaf.
So Eden sank to grief,
So dawn goes down to day.
Nothing gold can stay.


What do you think is the meaning of this poem? 

















How do you think it relates to The Outsiders?












Day Two: Chapter 1 & Characters
Objectives:
·        Students will compare and analyze author’s perspectives of a character, personality, topic, setting, or event.
·        Students will begin to locate and analyze the elements of setting, characterization, and plot to construct understanding of how characters influence the progression and resolution of the plot.
·        Student will write responses to literature and develop insights into interpretations by referring to textual information for the quiz.

NJCCCS: 3.1.8.G.2; 3.1.8.G.4; 3.2.8.D.3
Materials: The Outsiders, Characterization Worksheets

(Check and record Vocab)

Class Discussion: Chapter 1
(Students should be taking notes throughout discussion)

Discussion Questions:
Who is the narrator? Where is the setting of the novel?
Why do you think the Greasers and the Socs do not get along?
How does this rivalry affect Ponyboy?
Why do you think Ponyboy likes books and movies?

Characterization  Activity
There are two ways in which we, the readers, learn about the characters in a novel.  Direct and Indirect Characterization. (Define on board; have students take notes)

Direct Characterization – where the writer makes direct statements about a character’s personality and tells what the character is like. (“Tells”)
Indirect Characterization – where the writer reveals information about a character and his personality through that character’s thoughts, words, and actions AND where the writer reveals information about a character by how other characters respond to that character, including what they think and say about him. (“Shows”)

(Distribute Character Worksheets)

Explain: you are going to complete a character description worksheet for each of the major characters in the novel.  You should be working on these as you read the novel. 
Importatnt: At the end of unit all of your Characterization Worksheets (8) will be due and will be graded as a test!  You will also be required to choose one of the characters to draw (using any materials, technology), and this will be included in the test grade. Details regarding the due date and the Character Drawing will be explained as we get closer to finishing the book.

Directions: As you add information about each character you must cite the page where they find the information AND determine whether it is an example of Direct or Indirect Characterization (D/ID).  The class will begin with Ponyboy and I will model the process for completing these sheets properly. (Complete Master Class Copy as well)

1)       Ask students to tell you something about the main character Ponyboy.
2)       Using the response received, ask students on what page they find that information (if applicable; if not be sure to get to an example that demonstrates citation.)
3)       Demonstrate how to cite (Ex: He likes to read (2))
4)       Ask students whether this information is an example of D or ID Characterization & discuss.
5)       Have students write label their other Characterization Worksheets with: Darry, Sodapop, Johnny, Dally, Two-Bit, Steve.
6)       Continue examples and discussion until end of period

Homework: Read Chapter 2 (19-36) and Vocabulary (due tomorrow); Remember to keep working on Characterization Sheets as you read!

Name___________________________________________     Period__________    Date___________

CHARACTERIZATION WORKSHEET: The Outsiders by S.E. Hinton

Directions: Use the space below to record all the information on a particular character.  You must cite the page where this information is located in the novel, if applicable.  You must also note whether this information is based on Direct (D) or Indirect (ID) Characterization.

CHARACTER NAME: _______________________________________________________________

Day Three: Chapter 2/Greasers & Socs

Objectives:
·        Students will demonstrate active listening behavior during class discussion and during group activity.
·        Students will demonstrate active listening by analyzing information, ideas, and opinions to determine relevancy to the discussion.
·        Students will present ideas and opinions spontaneously, orally, and appropriately in response to a topic, other speakers, and the literature.
·        Students will identify and use organizational structures to comprehend information by using a Venn Diagram to compare and contrast the Greasers and Socs.
·        Students will gather, select, and organize the most effective information appropriate to a topic and task as they complete the Venn Diagrams.

NJCCCS: 3.4.8.A.1-2; 3.3.8.A.2; 3.3.8.A.6-7; 3.1.8.A.1; 3.1.8.D.1
Materials: Characterization Worksheets, Venn Diagram Worksheets (+ Master Copy for projector)

(Check & record Vocabulary while distributing another Characterization Worksheet for Cherry –tell students that it is for Cherry!)

Chapter 2 Class Discussion
(Students should be taking notes and adding to their Worksheets throughout discussion)
Begin by asking: Does anyone have any questions or comments about the novel so far?

Discussion Questions:
What do you think about Dally?
What do you think about how the girls (Cherry and Marcia) reacted to Dally?  Ponyboy?  Johnny? Two-Bit?
Why do you think Cherry says, “I kind of admire him” (27) about Dally?
What are some of the rules of the gang (29)?
What does Ponyboy say about the difference between a gang and a pack (26)?
What happened to Johnny?  What affect do you think this had on the gang?
There are two important moments of foreshadowing in this chapter, what are they and what do they suggest may happen?

Greasers & Socs Venn Diagram Group Activity
1) Divide the class into 4 or 6 groups.  Assign each group either “Greasers” or “Socs”.
2) Each group must come up with a list of at least 5 things about the group they were assigned, citing where the information is found in the novel.
3) After collaborating for 10-15 minutes I will go around to check for at least 5 items per team (this will count as Classwork grade for each student in the group)
4) Venn Diagram worksheets will then be distributed to each student and we will reconvene as a class to discuss the findings.
5) During discussion students will fill in the Venn Diagram for the Greaser Circle and the Socs Circle. (Complete Master Class Copy as well)
6) Explain to the students the “Both Circle”, where they will put the things that are similar between the two groups, and discuss what can go in this category. (Complete Master Class Copy as well)

Journal Assignment
Explain to students that for HW they must respond to the following question in their journals.  Journal entries must be at least 1 page long.  Students must write the question on the top of the journal page.

Journal Question: Do you think that different groups of people are treated differently?  If so, how?  If not, why not?

Homework: Journal Entry (due tomorrow)




Day Four: Gangs/Family

Objectives:
·        Students will demonstrate their understanding by automatically setting a purpose for reading, making and adjusting predictions, asking essential questions, and relating new learning to background experiences.
·        Students will locate and analyze the elements of setting, characterization, and plot to construct understanding of how characters influence the progression and resolution of the plot.
·        Students will read critically by identifying, analyzing, and applying knowledge of the theme, structure, style, and literary elements of fiction and providing support from the text as evidence of understanding.
·        Students will respond critically to text ideas and the author’s craft by using textual evidence to support interpretations.
·        Students will be able to identify and understand the author’s use of analogies and metaphors by examining the gang/family relationship in the novel.

NJCCCS: 3.1.8.E.1; 3.1.8.G.4; 3.1.8.G.6-7; 3.1.8.G.11
Materials: The Outsiders, Anticipatory Worksheets

(Check and record Journals)

Class Discussion: Gangs/Family
Instruct student to take out their Venn diagrams.
Begin by reviewing Master Class Copy from yesterday. (Students should be taking notes throughout discussion)

Ask students: Does anyone have anything else to add to the Greaser Circle?  To the Socs Circle?

Discussion Questions:
(This discussion will utilize all Characterization Worksheets & the Venn Diagram)

How you do think these two groups are similar?
[Yesterday we discussed the rules of gangs, and packs] Based upon the novel, what is a gang?
(Critical Thinking: The goal is to get students to develop criteria for what makes a gang)
Do you think a gang can be like a family?  How so?
(Critical Thinking: The goal is to get students to develop criteria for what makes a family)
Are the boys in Ponyboy’s gang like a family?
What happened to Ponyboy’s real family?
What do you think of Johnny’s real family?  Who treats Johnny better: his family or his gang? Why?
Are the boys in the Soc gangs like a family?
What are the differences between the two groups?
What does Cherry think about the two groups?  Do you think she’s right?

Closing Activity: Foreshadowing/Anticipatory Exercise (Last 10 -15 minutes of class)
(Hand out Worksheets)

Read Quote from Chapter 2 to students.  Explain the directions: Based upon this quote, and what you know so far from the novel, what do you think this quote suggests about the novel?  What do you think may happen in the novel using this quote in as a clue?


Homework: Read Chapter 3 (37-52) & Vocabulary (due tomorrow); Remember to keep working on Characterization Sheets & Venn Diagram as you read!




Name___________________________________________     Period__________    Date___________

The Outsiders by S.E. Hinton
Directions: Respond to the quote below (5 sentence minimum)


In the last few lines of Chapter Two, Ponyboy says:


I really couldn’t see what Socs would have to sweat about—good grades, good cars, good girls, madras and Mustangs and Corvairs—Man, I thought, if I had worries like that I’d consider myself lucky.
I know better now (36).

Based upon what you already know from reading the novel and from Class Discussions, what do you think this means?? What do you think may happen in the novel using this quote in as a clue?



























Extra Credit: What literary element is this an example of?





Day Five: Chapter 3

Objectives:

·        Students will begin to examine and analyze ideas and recurring themes found in texts, such as the idea of fairness, social injustice, and classism.

·        Students will expand reading vocabulary by identifying and correctly using idioms (“Rat Race”) with literal and figurative meanings in their speaking and writing experiences.

·        Students will write responses to literature and develop insights into interpretations by connecting to personal experiences and referring to textual information.

·        Students will interpret text ideas through journal writing, discussion, and enactment.

NJCCCS: 3.1.8.G.3; 3.1.8.F.4; 3.2.8.D.3; 3.1.8.G.13

Materials: The Outsiders

Class Discussion: Chapter 3
(Students should have their Worksheets and Notebooks out and be taking notes throughout discussion)

Questions:
How do Cherry & Ponyboy explain the difference between Socs & Greasers?

What is the “Rat Race”?  Have you ever heard this expression before?

Why do you think Mickey Mouse was important to Soda?

Why do you think Darry hits Ponyboy?

Why do you think Cherry tells Ponyboy not to say “Hi” to her in the hallway?

Ponyboy says, “It isn’t fair” a few times in this chapter.  What do you think he is referring to?

What is not fair to Ponyboy? Do you agree or disagree?

Do you face these same problems in your life? Do you think teenagers face these same problems today?



Journal Assignment
For the last 20 minutes of class, let students write in their journals in response to the question below.  Before students are permitted to leave they must complete this assignment, which will count as a Classwork grade.  Journal entries must be at least 1 page long.

Journal Question: Imagine that you were a character in the book.  Would you be associated with the Greasers or with the Socs?  Why?



Homework: Read Chapter 4 (53-67) and Vocabulary (due tomorrow); Remember to keep working on Characterization Sheets & Venn Diagram as you read!



Day Six: Chapter 4

Objectives:
·        Students will use increasingly complex text guides to understand different text structure and organizational patterns (e.g. chronological sequence or comparison and contrast).
·        Students will locate and analyze the elements of setting, characterization, and plot to construct understanding of how characters influence the progression and resolution of the plot.
·        Students will read critically by identifying, analyzing, and applying knowledge of the theme, structure, style, and literary elements of fiction and providing support from the text as evidence of understanding.

NJCCS: 3.1.8.E.2; 3.1.8.G.4; 3.1.8.G.6
Materials: The Outsiders, Plot Worksheets

(Check and record Vocabulary)

Elements of Plot: The Outsiders
(Students should be taking notes and adding to their Worksheets throughout discussion)

Begin by briefly asking the students what occurs in Chapter 4.
Explain that Johnny killing the Soc and the two boys running away is considered part of the rising action.
Ask: Who knows what the rising action is?

Begin reviewing the elements of structure (delivery can be done on board, on PowerPoint, etc.)
Distribute Plot Worksheets to fill in as class discusses the elements of plot (though we will not be able to answer all of the question yet). 

*At then end of the unit this will be due and count as a Quiz grade!  Due date and more details will be explained as we get closer to finishing the book.
-         All fiction is based on conflict and conflict is presented in a structure format called plot (also considered the sequence of the story).
-         Foreshadowing is the use of hints or clues to suggest what will happen in the story.
-         The Inciting Force is the event or character that triggers the conflict.
-         Conflict: There are 4 major kinds of conflict (there can be more than one going on in a story)
1)       Person vs. Self – An internal conflict that involves the struggle between the character and his/her conscience
2)       Person vs. Nature – An external conflict that involves a struggle between the character and the elements of nature that are beyond his/her control
3)       Person vs. Person – An external conflict that involves a struggle, mental or physical, between two characters in the story
4)       Person vs. Society – An external conflict that involves the struggle between a character and the rules of laws that govern the society in which he/she lives.
-         Rising Action is a series of events that builds from the conflict (begins with the inciting force and ends with the climax).
-         Climax is the decisive moment which will determine the outcome of the story.  It is the high point of the story for the reader.  Frequently, it is the moment of the highest interest and greatest emotion.
-         Falling Action is the events after the climax which close the story.
-         The Resolution rounds out and concludes the action.

Continue discussing plot and the events in the chapter until end of period.


Homework: Read Chapter 5 (68-84) and Vocabulary (due tomorrow); Remember to keep working on Characterization Sheets, Venn Diagram, & Plot Worksheet as you read!


Name___________________________________________     Period__________    Date___________


The PLOT of The Outsiders
Please answer the questions below. (2-3 sentences per response)


1)      What is the conflict in The Outsiders?









2)      What are two examples of foreshadowing in the novel?


a.        









      b.









3)      What is the inciting force in the story?












4)      What is the rising action in the story?












5)      What is the climax of the story?













6)      What is the falling action of the story?












7)      What is the resolution of the story?











Day Seven: Chapter 5/Symbols/Poem

Objectives:
·        Read critically by identifying, analyzing, and applying knowledge of the theme, structure, style, and literary elements of fiction and providing support from the text as evidence of understanding.
·        Students will write responses to literature and develop insights into interpretations by connecting to personal experiences and referring to textual information.
·     Students will respond critically to text ideas by analyzing Robert Frost’s poem, “Nothing Gold Can Stay”.

NJCCCS: 3.1.8.G.6;ONE MORE; 3.2.8.D.3; 3.1.8.G.7

Materials: The Outsiders, Symbol Search Worksheets, Poem Worksheets

(Check and record Vocabulary; Distribute Symbol Search Worksheets)

Class Discussion: Chapter 5 & Symbols
(Students should be taking notes and adding to their Worksheets throughout discussion)

Review the events in Chapter 5: Begin by asking students to recap what has gone on in the chapter.  When students refer to the scene where the boys cut their hair introduce Symbols.

Explain that “hair” in The Outsiders is a Symbol.
Symbol – a thing that represents or stands for something else.
Ask: What do you think Ponyboy’s hair represents or stands for? (Discuss)
Ask: Does anyone recognize another symbol in Chapter 5? (Sunset, which appears a few chapters back too)

Instruct students to add symbols to the worksheet as the come across them reading, and to go back and see any symbols in the chapters we already read.

*Symbol Worksheet will be due at end of unit & will count as Quiz, more details regarding the due date and other instructions will be explained as we get closer to finishing the book.)

Continue discussing Chapter 5 events.


“Nothing Gold Can Stay” Activity
(Hand out worksheet)
For the last 10 minutes of class have students reflect on the poem that appears in Chapter 5.
(Read the poem aloud to the students) 

Instruct students to read the poem again and begin thinking about the questions.  Explain that the Worksheet that was distributed will be due tomorrow as HW. 

*Also, students will be expected to learn the poem and recite the poem to the class in 3 days.  Start practicing!  This will count as a Quiz!



Homework: Complete Poem Worksheet (due tomorrow); Practice reciting poem (due in 3 days).


Name___________________________________________     Period__________    Date___________

SYMBOL SEARCH: The Outsiders

Directions: Please list the different symbols you find in the story below.  Then, respond to the questions for each symbol.  Be sure to include the page numbers where you find your information!


SYMBOL:



What does this represent in the story?







SYMBOL:



What does this represent in the story?







SYMBOL:



What does this represent in the story?







SYMBOL:



What does this represent in the story?










Day Eight: Chapter 6

Objectives:
·        Read critically by identifying, analyzing, and applying knowledge of the theme, structure, style, and literary elements of fiction and providing support from the text as evidence of understanding.
·        Students will extend knowledge of specific characteristics, structures, and appropriate voice and tone of selected genres and use this knowledge in creating written work, considering the purpose, audience, and context of the writing.
·        Students will write responses to literature and develop insights into interpretations by connecting to personal experiences and referring to textual information.
·        Students will interpret text ideas through journal writing, discussion, and enactment.

NJCCCS: 3.1.8.G.6; 3.2.8.B.1; 3.2.8.D.3; 3.1.8.G.13

Materials: The Outsiders

(Collect Poem Worksheet)

Class Discussion: Chapter 6
(Students should be taking notes and adding to their Worksheets throughout discussion)

Begin reading Chapter 6 as a class (students can read aloud, professional readings on CD/MP3 can be incorporated).  Discuss as we read.  Remind students to keep track of Vocabulary as they read, it will be due tomorrow!

Discussion Questions:
Now that you’ve read about half the book, and have come to the part where Ponyboy refers to the poem we looked at before we started reading, what do you think the poem means to the story?
How has what Johnny did affected the rivalry between the two groups?
Where does this fit into the plot?
Do you think this all Cherry’s fault?  Do you think it’s anyone’s fault?
What do you think about Johnny and Ponyboy going back into the burning church?
Do you think that Johnny, Ponyboy, and Dally are heroes?  What makes a hero?
(Critical Thinking: the goal is to get the students to develop a criteria for “hero” and apply to characters)
Why is it such a shock to Ponyboy when Jerry tells him he shouldn’t smoke?
What is Darry afraid of?


Journal Assignment
For the last 15-20 minutes of class, let students write in their journals in response to the question below.  Before students are permitted to leave they must complete this assignment, which will count as a Classwork grade.  Journal entries must be at least 1 page long.

Journal Question: What is your definition of a hero?  Do you think that Johnny, Ponyboy, and Dallas are heroes?  Explain.

Homework: Tonight & Tomorrow - Finish Chapter 6 (85-99), if necessary, and Vocabulary (due in 2 days).  Read Chapter 7 (100-118) and Vocabulary (due in 2 days); Remember to keep working on Characterization Sheets, Venn Diagram, Plot Worksheet, & Symbol Search as you read!  Remind students that poem readings will take place in 2 days, practice!



Day Nine: Chapter 7/Article

Objectives:

·         Students will interpret text ideas through journal writing, discussion, and enactment.
·         Students will gather, select, and organize the most effective information appropriate to a topic, task, and audience.
·         Students will apply knowledge and strategies for composing pieces in a variety of genres.
·        Students will extend knowledge of specific characteristics, structures, and appropriate voice and tone of selected genres and use this knowledge in creating written work, considering the purpose, audience, and context of the writing.


NJCCCS: 3.1.8.G.13; 3.2.8.B.1; 3.2.8.D.1-2

Materials: The Outsiders



Class Discussion: Chapter 6 & 7
(Students should be taking notes and adding to their Worksheets throughout discussion)

Spend 20-25 minutes discussing the events of Chapter 6 (if necessary) and Chapter 7.



Newspaper Article Assignment
Inform students that they will be working on Newspaper Articles that must reflect events that have occurred so far in the story.  They may work on a story about Bob’s death or the Church Fire. 


Ø  Students must create a story that answers the questions: Who, What, Where, When, Why, and How!  Articles must be at least 3 paragraphs long. 
Ø  Students must also submit their articles in a Newspaper format using a computer or by drawing up the layout themselves.
Ø  Students must also use direct quotes from the book (3-5 quotes are necessary).
Ø  Articles will count as a Test!


They will have the rest of class day, tonight, and class time tomorrow to work on their articles.  The articles will be due the following day (either at the beginning of class or at the end, allowing them another period of class time to work on it—depends on how they do).



Homework: Work on Newspaper Article (due in 3 days) and practice reciting poem (due tomorrow); Finish Chapter 6 (85-99), if necessary, and Vocabulary (due tomorrow).  Read Chapter 7 (100-118) and Vocabulary (due tomorrow); Remember to keep working on Characterization Sheets, Venn Diagram, Plot Worksheet, & Symbol Search as you read!




Day Ten: Poem/Newspaper Articles


Objectives:

·        Students will give oral presentations to different audiences for various purposes (in this case, delivering a letter to a character in the novel).

·        Use speaking techniques, including voice modulation, inflection, tempo, enunciation, and eye contact, for effective presentations.

·        Acknowledge the audience with eye contact and use appropriate verbal responses to clarify questions and inquiries.

·        Read aloud with fluency.


NJCCCS: 3.3.8.D.6; 3.3.8.D.3-4; 3.3.8.D.8

Materials: The Outsiders, Creative materials & Laptops/Computers for working on Newspaper Articles

(Check and record Vocabulary from Chapters 6 & 7)



Poem Readings
Have students recite the poem.
*Students will be graded on how accurately they memorized the poem and their delivery (annunciation, speed, intonation, etc.). This will count as a Quiz grade.




Newspaper Article Assignment
After having all students recite the poem, give students the rest of the class time to work on their articles.
Students will need the next class period to work on their articles as well.  Due date will be the following day.




Homework: Work on your Newspaper Articles (due in 2 days)






Let us know, by leaving a comment, of your successful ideas/activities that you use when teaching this powerful novel.


Happy Reading!
Things You Can Read
Believe In Truth, Beauty, Freedom, Love, and the Power of Books!



1 comment:

  1. Wow...great lesson plans!!!

    I am glad I done making them. I retired after 34 years. :)

    Happy Hopping!!
    Elizabeth
    Silver's Reviews
    My Blog Hop Answer

    ReplyDelete

Your Comment is awaiting moderation. It will appear once it has been approved.

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...